Can Heart Attack Damage Be Reversed?

Can Heart Attack Damage Be Reversed?
Publish on 2020-04-09

Each year, a large number of people suffer from heart attacks, and one of the most common questions they ask is if the damage be reversed? Is one of the most common questions, asked by patients who’ve survived a heart attack.

To prevent falling prey to heart diseases, you can implement simple lifestyle changes, such as watching what you eat, exercising often, regulating your weight, and managing your stress levels.
 

However, is it possible to reverse it and not simply slow it down?

It is possible to reverse some of the damage, by making big, lasting changes to your lifestyle.

According to Dean Ornish, author of the best-selling book, Dr. Dean Ornish's Program for Reversing Heart Disease. Patients that underwent significant lifestyle changes, in less than a month were able to increase blood flow to the heart as well as increase its ability to pump normally. Additionally, the rate of chest pains fell by 90% in that time.

He also mentioned that on his program, within a year, they saw cases of severely blocked arteries in the heart becoming less blocked, and some cases of reversal after 5 years.

What Is Required

Weekly exercises for at least half an hour, doing activities such as walking, yoga, meditation, etc. Implementing dietary changes which if you’re only using to ingesting unhealthy food options may seem like such a drastic shift. This can be managed by starting out with moderate changes and building up from there.

Start by eating a plate full of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, soy products, nonfat dairy, and egg whites, and avoid fats, refined sugar, and processed carbs. Basically, just eat foods in their natural form as much as possible.

However, it is common knowledge that being active and eating a healthy diet are part of any healthy regime. In order to see real change, you will also need to:

  • Be at a healthy weight,
  • Regularly take all your medications,
  • Keep up with all your doctor visits,
  • Avoid smoking and being around secondhand smoke

If you’ve already had heart disease, you’ll need to be strict with implementing these changes into your lifestyle. And although you can’t cure heart disease, through living a healthy lifestyle, you can slow its progression.

You can keep your heart healthy and reduce the risk of another heart attack by avoiding stress, cutting out smoking, excessive drinking and just removing all-round unhealthy habits which cause more damage to your heart as well as overall health.

In time, these new changes and habits will start to feel more normal.

Afterall, numerous studies conducted have shown that the more positive changes people made to their diet and lifestyle, the better they felt and the more they wanted to keep doing it.

If you would like to learn more about how to prevent a heart attack, you can call or visit us to speak to our specialist cardiologist in Dubai. Or to schedule a consultation with our heart surgeon in Dubai.

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