Cholesterol Testing And Predicting Cardiovascular Disease

Cholesterol Testing And Predicting Cardiovascular Disease
Publish on 2019-09-03

Cholesterol is a wax-like substance mostly of fat, for an adult +75% of it found in the body is a produce of the liver and the rest is acquired from food intake. An adult body needs cholesterol to build healthy cells since it is an organic molecule and biosynthesized by all animal cells and is an indispensable fundamental component of animal cell membranes that provides it with strength and flexibility. Meaning it is a main part of cell walls and provides the body with the support needed to produce some hormones, vitamin D, and the bile necessary for fat digestion.

Which foods are rich with cholesterol?

The body needs proper cholesterol amount to operate properly which is majorly fulfilled by the liver with a very little support from external resources such as nutritious Eggs, Full fat Dairy (cheese and yogurt), Shell fish, sardines, meat, poultry, and organ meat like heart, liver, and kidney. Those kinds of foods are actually healthy and extremely nutritious to eat decreasing the risk of having heart diseases.

Yet, there are other sources such as fried food for having transformed fats, fast foods, processed meats and desserts can be detrimental to one’s health raising the risk levels of not only developing Cardiovascular diseases or heart complications but also do they increase the risk of developing obesity, diabetes, cognitive decline, and numerous chronic diseases.

Are there good and bad cholesterol?

There are two kinds of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL and this is simply harmful or bad) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL or simply healthy good cholesterol). Cholesterol travels in the blood in these forms. LDL is the main source of artery-clogging plaque. HDL actually works to clear cholesterol from the blood.

Testing Cholesterol levels in blood for cardiovascular disease prediction

Children and young adults who have no risk factors for heart disease, whether inherited or acquired, are usually tested once between (9 years – 11 years)  and again between (17 years – 19 years) . Retesting for adults with no risk factors for heart disease is usually every five years. If the test results are not within desirable ranges, a cardiologist might recommend more-frequent measurements. The cardiologist will probably also suggest more-frequent tests especially if there is a family history of high cholesterol, heart disease or other risk factors, such as  unhealthy life style smoking, diabetes or high blood pressure.

High levels of cholesterol can increase the risk of heart disease. With high cholesterol, clogs might form in the blood vessels. Eventually, these deposits grow, making it difficult for enough blood to flow through the arteries. Sometimes, those deposits can break suddenly and form a clot that causes a heart attack or stroke. It is true that a body needs some cholesterol to work properly. However, it is levels in body and blood should always be monitored and controlled to forfeit any future problems that might develop.

German Heart Centre in Dubai is one of the leading multi-specialty medical facility with gold rank team of consultants and specialists, book an appointment today at the best Cardiovascular Centre in Dubai, speak to one of our world-leveled cardiologist, and always be one-step ahead, we care and you should too.

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