Screening Guidelines for 4 Most Common Gynecological Cancers

Screening Guidelines for 4 Most Common Gynecological Cancers
Publish on 2018-12-20

The purpose of screening tests is to look for diseases before the patient starts showing symptoms. Early detection can help neutralize the disease through proper medication or surgery.

Uterine Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), it is crucial that women must be educated about the risks and symptoms of endometrial cancer during the time of menopause. Symptoms of endometrial cancer or uterine cancer include pelvic pain, abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge followed by pressure on the pelvic region. A yearly endometrial biopsy is often recommended for women with a history of uterine issues.

Cervical Cancer

For cervical cancer prevention, the tests should ideally start at the age of 21. Women who are between the ages of 21 and 29 must get a screening test in every 3-year interval. Those who are between the ages of 30 and 65 are recommended to get a screening once every 5 years. Women who have normal cervical test results and are over the age of 65 do not require testing. However, women who have a history of cervical pre-cancer and are over the age of 65 should continue screening for at least 20 years.

Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer

There are currently no screening tests available for vaginal and vulvar cancer, and the best way to detect signs is through routine check-ups by a qualified obstetrician-gynecologist (OB-GYN). Most common course for detection is pelvic exams to search for lumps, changes in the skin of the vulva or deformations in the vagina.

Ovarian Cancer

Currently, there are no screening tests available for ovarian cancer, and the main course for detection usually involves a pelvic exam. However, pelvic exams can only detect ovarian cysts only if they get large. The most common symptoms of detection are bloating, abnormal discharge and abdominal pain. At GHC we offer several programs on early risk assessment for ovarian cancer so patients can find their susceptibility to the disease.

How GHC Can Help?

Since each form of gynecological cancer entails its own set of unique risk factors, there is no general screening test for cancer detection. Each screening test is designed for specific risk assessment and may not detect multiple cancer formations. To get professional consultation from Dubai’s best gynecologist, visit German Heart Center Bremen in DHCC or get in touch with us on +971 4362 4797 or visit our website www.german-heart-centre.com

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